Honey in the making: a photo collection

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Bees are working everywhere.  Please don’t spray!  Especially when a plant is blooming. And don’t use insidious granules or injections on trees that continue to poison pollinators for years. 

Did you know spraying a blooming honey plant is also against the law?  Help protect the pollinators that are necessary to the majority of human food crops– not to mention the health of our ecosystems.

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Bee covered in dandelion pollen

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         Bee busy on butterfly lavender: they love regular lavender too

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Bee sipping nectar from a bluebell: note the pollen packet on her leg.

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Continuing a partnership began over a hundred million years ago

Bees on mountain blue

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Bee sipping from an English ivy bloom: photo taken in November when other nectar crops are sparse

bee on the way to pollinate clematis

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Bee heading for a clematis flower and working it

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Bees on mint blooms: one of their favorites

native bee posing for the camera?

stuffing pollen baskete

             bee on fennel                                                 Fennel is another favorite

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Bee on rosemary: herb nectar helps keeps bees healthy

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Love that rosemary!

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Bee on boxwood:  bees work tiny closed buds to get them to open. They will stimulate blooms on other plants to open as well.

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Is it just me or does this bee seem  a bit giddy?  They do seem delighted by blackberry blooms–and certainly, beekeepers are.  When the blackberry bloom is on in May and early June, the honey flow is abundant.

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Lunara blooms in early spring to bring in the bees

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And bees don’t forget the forget-me-nots

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We can’t say it too often!  Don’t poison bees that do so much for us–and don’t poison other wildlife, pets and children along with them!

These photos represent only a very small portion of the diversity of honey plants utilized by bees. For instance, there are our fruit and nut trees.   I didn’t get any pictures of bees working twenty or thirty feet in the air, but my burgeoning backyard fruit crop indicates their presence. There are also our ornamentals:  such as linden, locust, maple and poplar utliized for nectar, pollen, and propolis (the bee “antibiotic”).  They will also work single-petaled roses such as Nootka and Darwin’s Enigma and join native pollinators on mock orange and ceanothus.  Bees could compose their own plant encyclopedia– likely far more extensive than the ones humans put together!

See the Oregon Sustainable Beekeepers Site for information on protecting our honeybees and native pollinators.

These photos are protected by copyright (Madronna Holden 2013), but feel free to link here, and to share these photos with credit in any way that supports the health of our pollinator populations.

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